“Black Monday” – what, why and what next?

Trillions of dollars were wiped out from the financial market on Aug 24, 2015. Starting from China, it had its effects on other major markets of Europe, Asia and USA. The Shanghai composite index dropped by 8.5%, the biggest one day percentage fall since 2007, wiping out all the gains for the year. This raised fear of a near recession among the global investors, leading to a global sell off. Here’s what happened in the major economies on Aug. 24:

USA: Dow Jones lost more than 1000 points and ended the day down by 588 points

UK: £74 billion value was wiped off from the FTSE 100 index

Europe: Stock market suffered their worst trading day since 2011

Japan: Nikkei fell off by 4%. (The Guardian 2015)

Meanwhile, China in an effort to save the stock market plunge decided to cut the interest rate and inject liquidity to the banking system by lowering the bank’s reserve requirements. Despite, the move, Shanghai Index fell further by 1.3% the next day. As of now, a slightly bullish trend in most of the major economies can be seen.

Why?

Economist have long been predicting a slump in the Chinese financial market. It was just the question of “when?”. One of the major question of concern was “Is China really growing at a rate of 7%?”. Several prediction expected growth to be lower than that, raising concern on the reliability of the statistics provided by China, thereby indicating a slowing Chinese economy.

The Yuan Devaluation. In a move to put a stop to wiping off of huge amount of money in the financial market in recent months, China decided to devalue the Yuan, the biggest fall since 1994. Although this move was expected to boost the economy and stabilize the stock prices, it backfired. Investors interpreted this as a sign of slowing Chinese economy. It was evident that there was a stock bubble in the securities prices, the question only remained as of when the burst would occur? On Aug.24, when prices began to drop combined with the signal of a weak economy(evident through Yuan devaluation), there was a huge sell off, leading to stock market depreciation, not crash though! China can put in huge amount of money available in its reserves, before the stock market crashes, which might not be a scenario that shall occur anytime soon.

What Next?

The Fed has an important card to play on the interest rate. The much expected rate hikes in September is now a bit less expected following this turmoil. William Dudley, NY Fed Chief and a close ally of Yellen said that the September rate hikes look less likely. But these statement may just be a move to inspire rally in the equity market. Strong economic data from consumer confidence, housing data and the like signal a rate hike would be appropriate in context of United States. But before deciding as such, Fed Chair Janet Yellen has to weigh in on whether to hike interest rate based on strong economic data of US or postpone it for future date to play a more global role in the world economy and also protect the American firms with significant chunk of money coming from overseas.

It is all about wait and watch the Fed’s next move, which is most likely to postpone the rate hike decision to the end of year.

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